Tag Archives: Will and Trust Provisions

Strong Family Connections can Increase Life Expectancy

Posted on: June 28th, 2018 by Mitch

“The greatest gift you can give your family and the world is a healthy you” – Joyce Meyer

Over a century’s worth of research underscores the link between life expectancy, physical health and strong, healthy family connections. The researchers behind a new meta-analysis conclude family support can increase survival by up to 50 percent. Moreover, exercising or losing excess weight turns out to be less important to physical health than interpersonal social networks.

The researchers analyzed results of studies going back to the early 1900s with a total of 308,849 participants. Strong family connections were found to help improve health and extend life expectancy by protecting individuals from stressful situations or establishing a standard of healthy living.


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Don’t leave making a Will too late

Posted on: January 20th, 2016 by Mitch

Making a will is one of the tasks that people tend to put off most, and it’s one of the main reasons why every year millions of dollars worth of assets left by loved ones don’t end up in the right hands.

None of us like to talk about death and I can understand why, but failing to make a will can leave those left behind with significant problems and stress at what is already a tough time.

Also, having spent a lifetime working hard to accrue wealth and maybe property, surely you want to have a say in who receives what when you die?

A will can ensure that assets remain within the family and are passed on down the generations.


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Providing for Children or Adults with Special Needs

Posted on: January 20th, 2012 by Mitch

Planning to meet the needs of children or adults who have special needs is often complex. Special financial planning techniques may be needed so you don’t jeopardize any government benefits they may be receiving. A further complication arises because many who have special needs require advice and protection throughout their lifetime from someone with legal authority to act on their behalf. For most persons with special needs, particularly those who are judged to be mentally challenged, two types of protections are required:

1. protection of the estate left to the individual;
2. protection of his or her person in some form of guardianship.

In practice, provisions for these two types of protection often overlap.

Why should families plan?


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